Abstract Detail



Population Genetics/Genomics

Cohen, Jim [1], Ruane, Lauren [2].

Conservation genetics of Phlox hirsuta, a threatened serpentine species.

Phlox hirsuta, the Yreka Phlox, is a threatened species native to northern California.  The species is known from five populations in the area around Yreka, and the species inhabits serpentine soil.  Human development is a concern for the long-term viability of P. hirsuta given the small geographic range of the species and its close proximity to human activity.  Using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) generated via tunable Genotyping-by-Sequencing (tGBS) and 12 microsatellite loci, genetic diversity, population structure, and patterns of migration and demographic history were examined for 192 individuals from four populations (China Hill, Cracker Gulch, Greenhorn, and Soap Creek Ridge).  Analyses with fastSTRUCTURE and STRUCTURE, based on SNPs and on microsatellites, recognized three groupings of individuals, with these groups corresponding to China Hill, Greenhorn, and Cracker Gulch and Soap Creek Ridge, and similar results were identified via principal components analysis (PCA) and using Fst values.  SNPs resulted in the recognition of greater population substructure than was determined via the microsatellites.  The four populations are exchanging migrants, and migration also occurred for China Hill and for Greenhorn with the ancestral population of Cracker Gulch and Soap Creek Ridge.  Future analyses will further examine population substructure and patterns of migration as well as the impact of edaphic specialization and congeneric species on the population genetics of P. hirsuta.


1 - Kettering University, 1700 University Ave., Flint, MI, 48503.0, United States
2 - Christopher Newport University, Organismal And Environmntal Biology, 1 Avenue Of The Arts, Newport News, VA, 23606, United States

Keywords:
Phlox
Polemoniaceae
Serpentine
Conservation
California.

Presentation Type: Poster
Number: PPG002
Abstract ID:474
Candidate for Awards:None


Copyright © 2000-2018, Botanical Society of America. All rights reserved