Abstract Detail



Ericaceae: Systematics, Ecology and Evolution

Rose, Jeff [1], Sytsma, Kenneth J. [2].

Recent advances and future prospects in understanding the evolutionary dynamics of Ericaceae.

Methodological advances in understanding the processes of historical biogeography, species diversification, and testing the association of historical events with morphological traits has greatly enhanced our understanding of plant evolution. Several recent studies have recently applied these methods to Ericaceae and to the larger order Ericales. We discuss current progress in understanding the phylogeny, historical biogeography, diversification dynamics, and trait evolution of Ericaceae in the context of the family as well as in the context of the larger Ericales. We first outline the current best hypothesis of the placement of Ericaceae in Ericales and of intra-familial relationships in Ericaceae based on phylogenetic analysis of Sanger sequence data for 1,700/4,400 species of Ericaceae and whole-plastome data for several subfamilies and point to areas in need of further study. Next, we summarize our understanding of the diversification dynamics of Ericaceae, specifically pointing to clades that have experienced increases in speciation rate -- especially as detected across multiple studies -- and suggest why these clades may show higher than normal rates of speciation, particularly in the context of morphological innovation (see also Kriebel et al. in this symposium). Lastly, we discuss our knowledge of the historical biogeography of the family as a whole (see also Puente-Lelievre et al. in this symposium), assessing the relative contribution of long-distance dispersal and vicariance and place these events in the context of fruit type.


1 - The University of Wisconsin-Madison, Botany, 430 Lincoln Dr., Madison, WI
2 - University Of Wisconsin, Department Of Botany, Birge Hall, 430 Lincoln Drive, Madison, WI, 53706, United States

Keywords:
Ericales
diversification
historical biogeography
long distance dispersal
seed dispersal
vicariance.

Presentation Type: Colloquium Presentations
Number: 0001
Abstract ID:458
Candidate for Awards:None


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