Abstract Detail



Pacific Biogeography

Potter, Benjamin [1], Wagner, Warren [2].

Pacific Biogeography.

Pacific archipelagos rank among the most isolated landmasses on the planet, and are characterized by the high endemicity of their flora and fauna. As a result of this isolation, successful colonization events of Pacific archipelagos often require overcoming many challenges (i.e. transoceanic dispersal, inbreeding depression). Seed dispersal in the region is facilitated by vectors such as bird migrations, tropical storms and prevailing wind/oceanic-current patterns. Thus seed and fruit traits capable of taking advantage of these vectors, such as palatability/attachability to birds, or high buoyancy in combination with sea-water resistance, are observed relatively frequently across Pacific plant lineages. Despite the dispersal and establishment challenges imposed by the region, numerous plant lineages have successfully colonized Pacific archipelagos, and it is the study of these successes that make Pacific biogeography such a fascinating discipline. Moreover, from a research standpoint, next-generation sequencing advancements in recent years have allowed for highly-supported phylogenetic trees to be estimated for recently diverged Pacific taxa – offering exciting research opportunities that were not previously possible with Sanger-based inference. In this, our 3rd annual meeting, we aim to bring together those interested in the biogeography, evolution, ecology and conservation of plants in the Pacific region, and discuss ongoing research. Relevance:


1 - University of Auckland, School of Biological Sciences, Thomas Building, 3a Symonds Street, Auckland, 1010, New Zealand
2 - Smithsonian Institution, Department Of Botany, MRC-166, P. O. Box 37012, Washington, DC, 20013, United States

Keywords:
Pacific
Hawaii
New Caledonia
New Zealand
biogeography
evolution.

Presentation Type: Colloquium Presentations
Number:
Abstract ID:41
Candidate for Awards:None


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