Abstract Detail



Ecological factors that drive patterns of population genetic structure in plants

Gamba, Diana [1], Muchhala, Nathan [2].

Ecological factors that drive patterns of population genetic structure in plants.

Abstract/synopsis Population differentiation is regarded as the first step for speciation and thus diversification.  While much research had been devoted to using phylogenetic approaches to examine factors affecting diversification rates across plant clades, much less has explored the factors contributing to population divergence within species.  This colloquium aims to bring together researchers working at this level.  Talks will address both abiotic and biotic factors affecting gene flow between plant populations, in terms of either restricting gene flow and increasing differentiation or increasing gene flow and thus promoting genetic cohesion across a species.  Pollination and seed dispersal are critical components, as they determine gene movement, and evidence to date supports the general prediction that short-distance dispersal systems tend to increase population differentiation.  Landscape interacts with such movement, because gene dispersal agents are limited by physical barriers that can be natural or anthropogenic. Seasonality differences between sites can also be important, as this may lead to shifts in phenology and thus flowering asynchrony between conspecific populations. Research featured in this colloquium comprise an extensive variety of herbaceous and woody angiosperm plant species from North America to the Andes mountains and the Amazon basin in South America.  They also employ a range of techniques, including microsatellites and next-generation sequencing methods for genotyping and estimating the structure of genetic diversity in natural populations, and analytical approaches for disentangling pollen vs. seed mediated gene flow. By bringing together a diversity of systems and approaches, we hope to foster an exchange of ideas between speakers and the audience in terms of the best methods for the study of population differentiation and the key gaps that remain to be filled. We expect this symposium to be of broad interest to botanists of all subfields, as the biotic and abiotic mechanisms driving angiosperm evolution at the population level represent the critical first step for understanding macroevolutionary patterns of plant diversification. Relevance: Population differentiation is regarded as the first step for speciation and thus diversification, yet the causes of population divergence within species remain poorly explored.� This colloquium brings together researchers studying both abiotic and biotic factors affecting gene flow between plant populations, including mutualists (pollinators and seed dispersers), phenology, and geographic barriers.� Studies focus on a diversity of systems and genetic approaches, from genome-wide analysis of herbaceous and woody angiosperms from North America to the Andes mountains and the Amazon basin in South America. We expect this symposium to be of broad interest to botanists of all subfields, as the biotic and abiotic mechanisms driving angiosperm differentiation at the population level represent the critical first step for understanding macroevolutionary patterns of plant diversification.


1 - University Of Missouri - St. Louis, Biology, One University Blvd, 223 Research Bldg, Biology Department, St. Louis, MO, 63121, United States
2 - University Of Missouri - St. Louis, Biology Dept., R428 Research Hall, One University Blvd, St. Louis, MO, 63121, United States

Keywords:
population differentiation
plant mutualists
speciation
flowering asynchrony
geographic barriers.

Presentation Type: Colloquium Presentations
Number:
Abstract ID:33
Candidate for Awards:None


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