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Abstract Detail



Regional Botany Special Lecture - Barney Lipscomb and Jason Singhurst

Lipscomb, Barney [1], Jason, Singhurst [2].

A Botanical Waltz Across Texas: Biological Crossroads and Floral Wonders of the Lone Star State.

Due to its size and geological features, Texas is a vast and diverse landscape resembling much of the U.S. A major biological crossroads of America, it has a variety of land forms and habitats with a diverse flora and fauna. Four physiographic provinces converge in Texas: 1) Great Plains, 2) Central Lowlands, 3) Basin & Mtns., and 4) Coastal Plain. Elevations range from sea level in the coastal plain to 2667 m (8,751 ft) in the basin and mountains of west Texas. The variety of rainfall, soils, and elevation has resulted in tremendous biodiversity in the state. Today approximately 5,500 taxa of native and naturalized vascular plants are found in 10 vegetational areas including nearly half of the grass species indigenous to the U.S. and over 300 taxa that are endemic to the state. Texas is fortunate to have a wealth of information about its plant life, vegetation, and natural history due to many collectors and collections over the last 197 years, since the first scientific collecting began in Texas in 1820. A wave of zealous naturalists came, explored, and collected Texas in the 19th century. The 20th century marshaled in a new era of collecting and botanists who made new observations and discoveries. Herbarium specimens have accumulated and are a gold mine of information, information that is good for science and good for conservation in the 21st century. More than 225 Texas plants have been identified as rare and of conservation concern. Thirty-three species are listed as threatened or endangered. A Botanical Waltz Across Texas will give a broad overview of the 10 vegetational areas of Texas, highlight some of the unique and fascinating ecological systems, plus give a closer look at some of the more rare plants in the Lone Star State.


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1 - Botanical Research Institute of Texas, 1700 University Dr., Fort Worth, TX, 76107
2 - Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, 4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX, 78744

Keywords:
none specified

Presentation Type: Special Presentation
Number: S3001
Abstract ID:596
Candidate for Awards:None


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