Abstract Detail



Systematics

Doyle, Jeff [1], Coate, Jeremy [2].

Polyploidy and evolutionary novelty in plants, 35 years after Levin.

In 1983, Don Levin wrote a seminal review in which he defended genome doubling without hybridity—one definition of autopolyploidy—as capable of producing evolutionary novelty. He addressed the effects of genome doubling on “cytology”, “gene activity,” “physiology”, “development”, and “reproductive system”, and concluded with a long section on “ecological tolerances”. Much has been learned about each of these aspects of polyploidy since 1983, though greater focus has been on allopolyploids, in which the role of genome doubling is complicated by the integration of two differentiated genomes. Arguably the least well understood aspect of polyploidy, particularly of autopolyploidy, is its effect on cell biology. The “cytology” section of Levin’s review was the shortest, and primarily emphasized larger cells and nuclei in polyploids, and the surface-to-volume ratio differences that follow from their increased size. Little has been added to this discussion of putatively “nucleotypic” effects (direct effects of bulk DNA content on phenotype) in the literature on polyploid evolution, particularly in other influential reviews. Meanwhile, the field of cell biology has been revolutionized by technologies that now allow single cells to be studied directly at every level of “-omics”. Here we review developments in cell and molecular biology to identify many ways in which genome doubling could make an autopolyploid different from an isogenic diploid progenitor. We also highlight what we consider to be fertile avenues of cell biology research for understanding the role of genome doubling in evolution.


1 - Cornell University, School Of Integrative Plant Science, Plant Breeding & Genetics Section, 240 Emerson Hall, Ithaca, NY, 14853, United States
2 - Reed College, Biology, 3203 SE Woodstock Blvd., Portland, OR, 97202, United States

Keywords:
autopolyploidy
cell biology
nucleotype
novelty.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper
Number:
Abstract ID:340
Candidate for Awards:None


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