Abstract Detail



Physiology & Ecophysiology

Quick-Singh, Rishika [1], Montgomery, Rebecca [2], Savage, Jessica [3].

Does vessel transport capacity influence leaf out time in woody species?

Xylem is used to transport water from the roots to the rest of the tree. For water to conduct properly, vessels need to be continuous and free from damage. During cold winter months, water inside these vessels freezes and causes bubbles to form, which can expand to block water flow. Without a continuous column of water, plants are unable to bring water up to fuel normal processes, such as leaf development. Because plants with larger vessels are more prone to cavitation, it has been hypothesized that they will leaf out later than plants with smaller vessels. Only a few studies have examined the potential relationship between vessel size and leaf out time, and most rely on broad classification of wood anatomy type. Our project involves sectioning, staining, and image analysis of several species of trees. We are testing for correlations between average vessel diameters and leaf out date across species and with individual plants over an eight-year period. Preliminary results show no correlation within individual plants over this time period, and current work is being done to test for patterns between species. Our results lead us to believe the cyclic phenomena of leafing out to be more complex than previously thought.


1 - University of Minnesota - Duluth, Biology, 1035 Kirby Drive, 207 Swenson Science Building, Duluth, MN, 55812, USA
2 - 1530 Cleveland Ave N., Green Hall 115, St. Paul, MN, 55108, United States
3 - University Of Minnesota - Duluth, Biology, 1035 Kirby Drive, 207 Swenson Science Buildling, Duluth, MN, 55812, United States

Keywords:
xylem
phenology
leaf out.

Presentation Type: Poster
Number: PPE001
Abstract ID:199
Candidate for Awards:Physiological Section Best poster presentation


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